This is the central lymphoid organ in addition to the bone marrow. It weights about 10-15 g at birth and then grows to 30-40 g at puberty. It produces such chemical agents as thymulin, thymosin beta 4, thymosin alpha 1 and thymopoietin. It is placed in the superior mediastinum. In the young child it may extend to the anterior mediastinum for it regresses as age advances.

Arteries
Thymic branches of the internal thoracic artery and inferior thyroid artery.

Veins
Thymic veins which drain into the internal thoracic vein, inferior thyroid vein and the left brachiocephalic vein. The veins operate through the blood-thymus barrier.

Nerves
Sympathetic fibers reach the thymus via the stellate (cervicothoracic ganglion) or ansa subclavia. Parasympathetic fibers reach the gland through the vagus nerve. It also receives thymic branches of the phrenic nerve and also that of the descendens cervicalis (inferior root of ansa cervicalis).

 

 

There is nothing in anatomy not found in this website

The Human Anatomy Laboratory
Creator: Oluwole Ogunranti

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction
Cell biology
Histology
Embryology
Gross Anatomy
Lymphatic drainage
Organ integration
Clinical anatomy
Quiz

Dissector

Physiology

Biochemistry

Pharmacology

Chemical Pathology

Anatomical Pathology

Imaging

Medicine

Surgery



 

Main Subject Course Links

eAnatomy eAnesthesia eBiochemistry eChemical pathology eCommunity Health
eDermatology eENT eGynecology eHematology eImaging
eMedicine eMedical microbiology eObstetrics eOphthalmology ePathology
ePediatrics ePharmacology ePhysiology ePsychiatry    eSurgery/eOrthopedics
eLab eOSCE eProcedures eInvestigations eSchool/Videopage
eOrgans eLocator Anatomy Museum eDissector eFractures/Dissect-it-yourself
All diseases eClerking eTreatment eDoctor ePatient